Our People

Andrés Duany, architect, urban designer, planner and author, has dedicated over three decades to pioneering a vision for sustainable urban development and its implementation. He has influenced planners and designers worldwide, redirected government policies in the U.S. and abroad, and produced plans for hundreds of new and renewed communities of enduring value.

Duany’s leadership can be credited with the plan and code for Seaside, the first new traditional community; the Traditional Neighborhood Development (TND) zoning ordinance; the development of the SmartCode, a form-based zoning code, adopted by numerous municipalities seeking to encourage compact, mixed-use, walkable communities; the definition of the rural to urban Transect and Agrarian Urbanism; as well as inventive affordable housing designs, including Carpet Cottages and Cabanons.

Duany is the author of many essays and articles, and co-author of several books, including Suburban Nation: the Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream. The SmartCode, The Smart Growth Manual, Garden Cities: Agricultural Urbanism, and The New Civic Art.

Duany’s work has been recognized with numerous awards, including the Richard Driehaus Award, the Jefferson Medal, The Vincent Scully Prize and several honorary doctorates.

Andrew Moneyheffer is an urban and architectural designer with over seven years of experience, ranging from community and neighborhood planning to urban redevelopment and building design. He is an illustrator in watercolor and other media, and he has participated in the implementation of several projects.

Town architect for the Kentlands homeowners’ trust, Moneyheffer provides design review services, often drafting conceptual plans and elevations to help applicants with code-compliance. He also has experience with the SmartCode, Light Imprint New Urbanism, agricultural urbanism, green building, and classical architecture.

Moneyheffer gained practical construction experience as a carpenter for a homebuilder in Indiana during the summers of his student years.

Brian Lemmerman is an urban and architectural designer with a professional architecture degree. He has experience in a variety of urban project types, including regional plans, transit-oriented development, suburban retrofit and downtown revitalization. A watercolor illustrator, graphic artist, and social media expert, he recently disembarked from the interactive marketing and advertising agency, THR33FOLD, that he founded in 2009. Lemmerman’s civic engagement revolves around bicycle advocacy and climate change adaptation.

Chris Ritter is an architectural and urban designer and planner with more than fifteen years of experience across a broad variety of project types throughout the world. Ritter’s hand-drawn three-dimensional illustrations are a critical component of the project design and implementation process. His drawings emerge in parallel with the master plan, influencing the plan as well as testing it in process. His aerial renderings drawn in elaborate detail describe the urban and architectural character of a place specific to its underlying geography and culture.

Christina Miller is an architect, urban designer and planner, with over 15 years of professional experience. Her architectural experience began with Paolo Soleri at Arcosanti, and includes all phases of building production from schematic design to construction observation for a variety of residential and commercial types, including the recently completed University of Miami president’s house.

Miller’s urban design and planning experience includes regional and master plans, urban revitalization, and agrarian urbanism, promoting sustainability in the firm’s plans and regulations. She led the LEED-ND Pilot Program test for two DPZ projects, and she helped establish DPZ’s garden as part of the firm’s Agricultural Initiative, a topic on which she has lectured. Miller’s civic activities include participation in regional committees addressing climate change adaptation.

Daniel Morales is an urban and architectural designer with a professional architecture degree. He has experience with a variety of urban project types, including regional plans, new communities, transit-oriented development, suburban retrofit and downtown revitalizations. His experience in architecture includes an emphasis on classical architecture and preservation, as well as the design of housing and office buildings.

Dylan Wassell is an urban and architectural designer with a professional architecture degree. With prior experience in architectural production and graphic design, he has worked on a variety of project types, including new community plans, downtown revitalization, urban infill, and housing design. Working with Andres Duany, he has been contributing to the illustrations and graphic design of two publications in progress, Heterodoxia Architectonica, and Transect: a General Theory of Ecological Urbanism.

Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk is an architect and urban designer and planner, with over thirty years of experience in a variety of projects at every scale, including regional plans and municipal zoning codes, downtown and neighborhood revitalizations, new towns and neighborhoods, streetscapes and building designs.

Recipient of numerous awards, she has been an initiator of many of the firm’s advances over the years, is a sought-after speaker, has published numerous essays and is co-author of Suburban Nation: the Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream, and The New Civic Art.

Plater-Zyberk has maintained a career-long affiliation with the University of Miami School of Architecture, continuing to teach after 18 years as Dean of the School. She is active in a variety of volunteer positions locally and nationally.

Eusebio Azcue is an urban and architectural designer and renderer with more than four decades of experience. He has led and participated in architectural and urban planning projects across the world, and maintains a research agenda on urban design and planning. Originally from Spain, Azcue lived and practiced in Mexico, Cuba, Angola and Morocco before settling in Miami. He has participated in almost every DPZ planning charrette and has a masterful knowledge of traditional architecture and place-making for cultures throughout the world.

Galina Tachieva is a planner, urban designer and architectural designer with more than twenty years experience in sustainable urbanism, urban redevelopment, sprawl repair, and form-based codes. She is the author of the award-winning Sprawl Repair Manual (Island Press) and the SmartCode Sprawl Repair Module.

Multilingual, Tachieva has experience with projects across the United States, Latin America, Europe and Russia, including regional plans, environmental conservation, new communities, resort towns, downtowns and urban infill, and commercial, retail, institutional and residential buildings. Managing complex projects and teams, she has led charrettes and other public processes, from project initiation through implementation.

Tachieva maintains an active civic engagement. A member of the Congress for the New Urbanism (CNU) she has been leading its national Sprawl Retrofit Initiative. She is a founding member of the Council for European Urbanism (CEU), and she has lectured throughout the world. She has been a visiting lecturer and design critic at Harvard University, the Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO), and at the University of Miami.

Heather Smith is an urban and architectural designer with a professional architecture degree. She has worked on a variety of project types, including new community and transit oriented development master plans, main street revitalization, large apartment building façade design, and housing plans. She worked as a planning intern at Windsor, in Vero Beach, a DPZ designed community. She has also contributed to up-dating several publications, including The Lexicon of the New Urbanism, and the soon-to-be published Public Works Manual.

Judith Bell is a planner and urban and architectural designer with ten years of experience in a variety of project types, from regional plans and new community master plans, urban revitalization and infill plans, and design guidelines and zoning codes. She has participated in projects in North and South America, the Caribbean, Europe and China, and she has lectured on the New Urbanism and the SmartCode in Paraguay.

Bell has been a leader in various DPZ office initiatives to organize information and document projects. As a contributor to Galina Tachieva’s Sprawl Repair Manual, Bell managed documentation and graphic design. She also coordinated the production of Andres’ Duany’s Garden Cities: Theory and Practice of Agrarian Urbanism.

Marina Khoury is an architect, urban designer and planner, with more than sixteen years of experience in a broad range of project types from regional plans to new community and redevelopment plans and regulations, to building designs including affordable housing.

Fluent in several languages, she has designed and managed projects across the United States, Europe, and the Middle East, including new communities ranging in size from 50 to 2,000 acres (30 to 1,600 hectares), brownfield redevelopment, agricultural urbanism, and form-based zoning codes, among them Miami 21, a new zoning code for the City of Miami. Khoury’s experience includes managing complex public projects and teams, leading charrettes and other public meetings, and guiding approvals processes.

She is active in Washington area civic groups, including the local chapters of the American Institute of Architects and of the Congress for the New Urbanism, and she lectures on affordable, sustainable and walkable communities.

Matthew Lambert is an architectural and urban designer and planner, with more than a decade of experience that covers a broad range of project types, from multi-county regional plans, to new community and redevelopment plans and regulations, to affordable and modular housing design.

He has managed projects for campus plans, hospital strategic master plans including program distribution, resort towns, and disaster recovery plans, throughout the U.S., and he has worked with communities in the Caribbean, Europe and the Middle East. He also leads DPZ’s information technology team.

Lambert is active in the Congress for the New Urbanism; he is a founder of the CNU Next-Gen. As a member of the Transect Codes Council, he is contributing to the evolution of the Smart Code. He is also active in civic affairs in South Florida.

Michael Huston is a licensed architect, urban designer and planner, with over twenty years of professional experience. His background includes a decade of designing educational facilities, a number of years devoted to downtown revitalization in Louisville, KY, working first with city government and subsequently in partnership with a developer, and many years in private practice.

Huston’s experience in all phases of development and design has been an important contribution to his work at DPZ on master plans for transit oriented development and sprawl repair, as well as on building type studies for those plans.

Michael Weich is a project manager and designer with over 9 years of experience in planning and urban and architectural design, including regional plans, mixed-use new towns, transit-oriented development and suburban retrofit projects in the United States, Canada, Europe, and the Middle East. He has played a key role in the planning, design, and management of several large DPZ projects in Saudi Arabia.

Michael joined DPZ in 2006 and works in the firm’s Kentlands office in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Weich and his family live in Kentlands, one of DPZ’s first Traditional Neighborhood Developments. He is an active member in the community, and manages the Kentlands Community Garden, a project he helped to design and build.

Senen Antonio is an architect, urban designer and planner with nearly twenty years of international experience in sustainable design and planning, including plans for regions, military base redevelopment, transit-oriented development, disaster recovery, urban reclamation, revitalization and infill, and new towns, in Asia, Africa, Europe and North America.

Antonio has managed projects across all phases from conceptual design through construction. He lectures widely, with a recent focus on Asia, with government and university-sponsored lecturers in China, Laos, Indonesia, and the Philippines, and he contributes articles to professional journals.

Xavier Iglesias, is a planner and architectural and urban designer with over twenty-five years of experience. His planning and urban design experience includes master plans and design regulations across the transect, from rural villages to downtown revitalizations, for developers, not-for-profit organizations and municipalities. Iglesias leads DPZ’s Healthcare Initiative involving campus and community plans for Bon Secours Virginia Health System.

His architectural experience includes all phases of building design from feasibility studies and schematic design through construction documents and observation, for a variety of building types, from single and multi-family residential to educational, medical and civic structures. He leads design review for Schooner Bay, the Bahamian eco-village.

Iglesias also directs DPZ’s public relations, coordinating publicity and awards, and he edited the firm’s principal monographs, Towns and Town-Making Principles (1991), The Architecture of Duany Plater-Zyberk and Company (2005), and the Richard H. Driehaus Prize Monograph (2008).

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